We Exist To Rescue And Restore Victims Of Sexual Slavery Through The Love And Power Of Jesus Christ.

—2019—

Annual Report


STRIDES TOWARD THE

impossible

The LOVE146
ANNUAL REPORT

JULY 1, 2017 - JUNE 30, 2018

 



 
 

A Letter From Our President,
Rob Morris

How is this possible?

That’s a question I asked over 16 years ago, when I first saw children being bought and sold with my own eyes... when I first began doing this work. When I heard of the horrific things that were happening to children, I wondered if recovery was even possible. Even now, it’s hard not to question our vision at Love146: “The end of trafficking and exploitation. Nothing less.” Is ending this nightmare that affects millions of children every year even possible?

I hope as you read through this annual report you’ll see the impact we are making together. You’ll see that recovery is possible for children who have been severely abused and exploited. You’ll see prevention programs that are reaching exponentially more at-risk children. Does that cause hope to rise in you like it does me?

This hope comes from the grit and determination of children who are absolutely insistent on taking their childhoods and lives back every day. It comes from the tireless dedication and perseverance of our staff that consistently give of themselves to this mission. And it comes from your passionate desire to create a safer world for children expressed through your belief, action, and generosity.

When I think of the children in our care, our staff, and you, I’m reminded of what Muhammad Ali said: “Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

Thank you for turning the impossibile into reality, day after day, year after year. I’m so grateful to be on this journey with you.

Rob Morris
Love146 President & Co-founder

 
 

“We do not take a ‘one size fits all’ approach to the children in our care. We focus on the individual child and their needs and desires. We consider their vulnerabilities and cultural backgrounds, then shape our programs accordingly. Because of this, what Love146 offers, both domestically and abroad, is unique and beautiful.”

–DR. STEPHANIE GOINS,
LOVE146 DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM
DEVELOPMENT & AFRICA

HIGHLIGHTS THIS YEAR

WE’VE REACHED OVER 30,000 CHILDREN

Just as we entered this year, Love146 surpassed having reached over 30,000 children. It began over 15 years ago through partnering with some amazing safe homes in Asia, and grew to opening our own safe home and then reaching children with prevention and community education. Every decision we make at Love146 comes back to the question: How will this matter for children affected by trafficking?

WE’RE NOW WORKING WITH CHILDREN ON A 4TH CONTINENT

This year, Love146 launched a pilot project bringing prevention to children in Madagascar and Liberia. Human trafficking in Africa is a growing problem, and increasing Internet access in Africa, while improving quality of life, is likely to make child sexual exploitation even worse. We believe that trafficking and exploitation can be stopped before it happens. Thanks to collaboration with implementing partners, we were able to reach more than 5,000 children this first year with our “My Body is Mine” flip chart. Telling a story of several children’s encounters with a predator, the flip chart emphasizes four key messages: “I am valuable and so are you!,” “Safety is my right,” “My body belongs to me,” and “I can get help.”


THANKS TO OUR AFRICA PILOT’S FOUNDING FUNDERS & IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS


Mosaic Church, Winter Garden, FL | Sandi Young
Houston's First Baptist Church
, Houston, TX | Anonymous


While several organisations are implementing our My Body is Mine flip chart, these partners have been critical in training and leading in bringing this program to their regions:

Orphan Relief & Rescue, Liberia
Growing The Nations Therapy Programmes, Madagascar


 

1.6 MILLION YOUTH & PARENTS REACHED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE CITY OF HOUSTON  

This year, we partnered with the Mayor’s office of the City of Houston to produce a campaign called #WatchForTraffick, designed to reach youth and their caregivers and make them aware of how to notice trafficking, and equip them with resources like online safety information. Nationwide, the ad campaign reached 1.6 million youth, parents, and caregivers, and we measured that over 43,000 people engaged more with the content — a rate far higher than industry standards for advertising. In the end, it’s about keeping children safe, and this partnership with the City of Houston was an amazing collaboration to do just that.

Screen Shot 2019-03-29 at 8.10.01 PM.png

THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF WELCOMING OUR FIRST SURVIVOR CARE CLIENT

After having supported survivors through partner organizations for several years, we transitioned to operating our own safe home. It was in January of 2008 that Love146 welcomed our first Survivor Care client in the Philippines. Since then, we’ve reached 554 children through our Survivor Care programs in the Philippines, US, and UK — and we’ve reached over 2,500 survivors through professionals we’ve equipped.

THE PASSING OF SESTA LEGISLATION

This spring, we held a press conference in our headquarters with Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal and Theresa Leonard, a person with lived experience of being trafficked as a child. We were advocating for the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA), which enables prosecutors, law enforcement, and survivors of trafficking to take legal action against websites that knowingly promote sex trafficking. In our US programs, when a youth goes missing, we have gone looking at online classified sites like Backpage.com to see if we could find them. Now websites like Backpage that knowingly facilitate the rape of children can be held accountable. The sale of children continues because along the way people buy, facilitate, support, and ignore it, and it will end when we come together and say “no more.” After the law passed, many sites stopped running the ads. Though the law isn’t perfect, we’re heartened that commercial marketplaces advertising children for sale are no longer something we tolerate as society, and some sites have even been shut down

 

SURVIVOR

CARE

OUR APPROACH...

provides a space of safety.

believes freedom from trafficking and exploitation . isn’t an event, but a journey.

journeys with survivors over the long haul, and our . commitment goes beyond childhood.

prioritizes healthy integration into community.

offers holistic care, addressing the biological, psychological, . social, financial, and spiritual impacts of victimization.

collaborates with existing local resources, sharing information . and partnering to ensure wraparound care.

strives to see survivors become self-sufficient, flourishing . adults, free from revictimization or dependency.

PAGE 9 . LOVE146

DEMOGRAPHICS OF YOUTH IN SURVIVOR CARE

Data from the full history of Survivor Care programs  

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF SURVIVOR CARE CLIENTS BY REGION

PHILIPPINES UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES

The average age of all clients is The average age of all clients is The average age

of all clients is

13 17 15

GENDER OF YOUTH IN OUR SURVIVOR CARE GLOBALLY

RACE OF OUR YOUTH IN OUR UNITED STATES SURVIVOR CARE

PAGE 10

 SURVIVOR CARE THAT IS BOTH LOCAL & GLOBAL

Our local and international work with survivors of child trafficking positions us at a unique vantage point. We started in Southeast Asia and have expanded to the US and the UK. Our experience in the developing world informs our programs in the developed world, and vice versa. Things we learn in the Philippines impact the way we work in Connecticut.

By working both locally and globally, we identify which components of care are regionally relevant and which are universally relevant. For example, many of us imagine that the best way to care for trafficking survivors is through safe homes, but a full service safe home may not be as relevant in a community where a range of direct services already exists. In the Philippines, we provide complete care for children in safe homes — and our staff includes, for example, a dietitian and a nurse, in addition to counselors. In the United States, on the other hand, we provide a trauma-informed professional who journeys alongside the child, ensuring that they have access to all of the community services necessary for recovery. However, in both contexts, we see the importance that a sense of family emerges as a strong component in the recovery process. In both contexts as well, we’ve found it is critical for the survivor to know their care will not cease when they turn 18 or 21, but that they will have support and love as they mature and walk forward.

We’re a small organization with a wealth of experience both global and local, offering programs that provide direct services to children recovering from trafficking in the US, the UK, and Asia.

Screen Shot 2019-04-08 at 5.59.02 PM.png

IMPACT OF SURVIVOR CARE

554

YOUTH REACHED DIRECTLY BY LOVE146’S

SURVIVOR CARE PROGRAMS GLOBALLY


170

Youth reached directly by Survivor Care in the Philippines

359

Youth reached directly by Survivor Care in the United States

25

Youth reached directly by Survivor Care in the United Kingdom


US SURVIVOR CARE GROWTH

Cumulative youth reached by year

PAGE 12 . LOVE146

No matter what a child has experienced, we at Love146 are consistently there. They can count on us; I show up week after week and look them in the eye and tell them: “This setback is only a setback. It doesn’t have to define your life.” The consistency of hearing that from someone they can trust allows them to believe it, little by little. Even if they don’t believe it for themselves,

THEY CAN BORROW MY BELIEF

IN THEM – BECAUSE

I’M NOT GOING AWAY.”

–A LOVE146 SURVIVOR CARE SOCIAL WORKER

“I realized here with Love146 that there is no small or
big success, and that

NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE IF WE JUST BELIEVE

IN OUR ABILITY.”  

–A 15-YEAR-OLD IN OUR SURVIVOR CARE

 

 Page 16

PREVENTION EDUCATION

OUR APPROACH...

moves beyond traditional awareness, facilitating skill building to decrease vulnerability.

considers all genders as potential victims and perpetrators, and provides activities for co-ed, male, female, and/or LGBTQ groups.

is research-based and grounded in best practices in the field of prevention education.

is designed for schools, child welfare and juvenile justice agencies, and other community settings.

integrates a holistic view by focusing on individual strengths and personal and societal pressures that create or increase vulnerabilities.

PAGE 17 . LOVE146

HOW FEEDBACK FUELS OUR PREVENTION

EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

Just like no two children are the same, we have learned over the years that no single narrative describes how children are trafficked or exploited. This simple fact explains why creating an effective prevention program demanded deep thinking, collaboration with the top experts in the field, research on best practices in effective prevention, and input from survivors. True prevention, we concluded, needs to go beyond awareness to the hard work of teaching vulnerable and at-risk youth real-life skill building.

We spent two years developing and piloting Not a Number, our interactive prevention curriculum. It guides youth to explore their own vulnerabilities, showing them how a trafficker might use those vulnerabilities to take advantage of them, and how they can get help and navigate to safety. Much of what makes Not a Number distinctive comes directly from our work with survivors. It is our best resource for being aware of emerging trends, such as how apps and other technology are being used to exploit children. We heard stories that forced us to re-think what had been accepted in the field about who is getting trafficked or exploited, how it happens, and what the real-world risk factors are. Then we had to figure out what we could incorporate into our program that would reduce those risks. It’s why Not a Number considers all genders as potential victims and perpetrators, and provides activities for co-ed, male, female, and/or LGBTQ groups.

We’re confident that we have built a thoughtful and effective program. But to make sure that Not a Number is truly making an impact, we developed an app to track outcomes. With this feedback and the real-time data coming from our social workers, we are able to keep the prevention training up to date, and keep Not a Number fresh and relevant to youth.

PAGE 18 . LOVE146

IN PREVENTION EDUCATION, WE OFTEN ENCOUNTER YOUTH WHO’VE ALREADY HAD

TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCES...

but are struggling with confusion about what happened or fear to trust and disclose. One youth participated in a group going through our prevention curriculum, Not a Number. Given her past experiences, it was hard for her to engage, and she struggled to complete the modules. But she said Love146 stayed on her mind.
She thought about how Love146 helps youth. We recently connected with this youth again, and when
we did, she was ready. An introduction to the issue through Prevention Education gave her greater understanding, and as she found the strength she needed to begin to trust — she allowed us to support her as she began her journey of healing.
 

IMPACT OF PREVENTION & COMMUNITY EDUCATION

36203

YOUTH HAVE BEEN REACHED BY LOVE146 PREVENTION & COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS

5450

Youth have been reached in Madagascar & Liberia

127

Facilitators have been certified in Madagascar & Liberia

24243

Youth reached in the United States

576

Facilitators have been certified in the United States.

Our Prevention Education in the US has utilized third party analysis to improve our approach. Below are some preliminary outcomes. After this input, the measurements and curriculum itself underwent adjustments in response to better connect with youth. Other Love146 programs are also seeking funding for more rigorous outcome evaluations.

HOW DO WE MEASURE PREVENTION?
RATES OF CHANGE IN YOUTH - BEFORE & AFTER NOT A NUMBER

Preliminary Third-Party Analysis, February 2017
Crimes Against Children Research Center - University of New Hampshire

A LETTER FROM OUR CEO,
STEVE MARTIN  

As CEO of Love146, I’m tugged in two directions: ensuring the regular and steady growth that’s marked our history on one hand, and my natural urge to move faster and push harder in order to help more children on the other. We know that continuous, stable growth is not easily achieved, but it is the result that will have the great benefit for children and against traffickers in the long run. And thanks to your generous support, that’s what we’re seeing at Love146.

In the last two years, Love146 has seen a significant growth spurt, hitting some important milestones. In the US we've raised more than ever, just shy of $4.5 million in annual revenue. We’ve now impacted more than 30,000 children through our global programs (not including the more than 1 million youth who’ve accessed our online resources). We’re now reaching children on four continents. Our US Prevention Education curriculum, Not a Number, is being used in 20 states. And in 2019 we’ll celebrate the 10th anniversary of our Round Home in the Philippines.

Building a strong foundation has allowed us to work more effectively year after year, while still taking advantage of growth opportunities — a formula that one day, we hope, will see our mission achieved and put us “out of business” forever.

Steve Martin
Love146 CEO

REVENUE & EXPENSES  

PROGRAM SPENDING BREAKDOWN  

 REVENUE STREAMS

Love146 finished 2017/18 with donative revenue of $3,313,411, representing 9% growth over 16/17. Growth at Love146 outpaced the national average by 3.8%.*

WE’VE REACHED OVER 30,000 CHILDREN

Just as we entered this year, Love146 surpassed having reached over 30,000 children. It began over 15 years ago through partnering with some amazing safe homes in Asia, and grew to opening our own safe home and then reaching children with prevention and community education. Every decision we make at Love146 comes back to the question: How will this matter for children affected by trafficking?

PR Rescue

ORG

 

OFFICE LOCATIONS

CONNECTICUT OFFICE

P.O. Box 8266
New Haven, CT 06530

NORTH CAROLINA OFFICE

1800 Camden Road
Suite 107-273 Charlotte, NC 28203

UK OFFICE

P.O. Box 51700 London, SE8 9BX United Kingdom

Love146 is one of only a few hundred organizations that has met all 20 standards of charity accountability set by the Better Business Bureau.  

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

UNITED STATES

Belinda Bauman
Peggy Crane, Secretary
Ellie Dyk
Leticia Hashem
Brian McGown, Chair
Rob Morris, Ex Officio
David Sullivan, Treasurer

UNITED KINGDOM

Louise Cherrie
Jennifer Herrera, Treasurer
Rob Morris
Matt Stephens, Chair

PHILIPPINES

Dr. Antero Rosauro V. Arias, Jr., PhD
Dr. Jesusa Marco, PhD
Steve Martin, Chair
Rob Morris
Desi F. Thomas, Secretary & Treasurer
Dr. Gundelina Velazco, PhD

OUR VALUES

WE HOPE

We choose to hope as an act of defiance in the face of violence and horrific abuse. Children are our teachers. Undeterred by despair and cynicism, we insist that every step is worth it.

WE ARE THOUGHTFUL

We are working within a very complex issue. It is worth extra time and resources to be thoughtful so that our solutions will endure and have a greater impact.

WE LISTEN

We welcome diverse perspectives to the Love146 table, refining our approach by listening to others with experience. We are forever learners: hearing, thinking, and responding deliberately.

WE COLLABORATE

We don’t reinvent the wheel. Instead, we ask, “How can we be helpful?” As specialists, we are more effective when we collaborate with other specialists. We are stronger together.

WE INNOVATE

We challenge assumptions. In the midst of a daily sense of urgency, we imagine, develop, tweak, grow, and evolve solutions that work.

WE PERSEVERE

We stick around for the long haul. Our story isn’t just about victories, triumphs, and fairytale endings — it’s about not giving up. We embrace stories that never truly end: that have complexity, struggle, beauty, and humanity.

LOVE 146

END CHILD TRAFFICKING AND EXPLOITATION 

203.772.4420 | INFO@LOVE146.ORG | WWW.LOVE146.ORG


No identifiable children pictured in this piece are known to be exploited, and
names of those affected throughout this booklet have been changed for protection and privacy.